Photographer Ying Ang gives us her take on Photoville, Brooklyn’s annual photography festival.

Photographer Ying Ang gives us her take on Photoville, New York City’s biggest annual photography festival.

Ying Ang is an Australian photographer whose 'Gold Coast' series is featured in Huck 46 - The Documentary Photography Special II.

Photoville has become the largest annual photographic event in New York City in just two years. This year it took place in 52 old shipping containers on Pier 5, Brooklyn Bridge Park and involved 265 artists showing off their work through exhibitions, outdoor photo installations, talks, workshops, and multimedia projections.

The work that I found the most interesting was experienced on a two-fold level at Photoville. I was looking for work that was visually engaging and also installed in a way within the containers that showed an innovative approach to use of space.

Trace

Traces by Ian Teh

Traces by Ian Teh

Ian Teh’s installation was minimal but powerful in the scale and shape of the work within the stark environment of the container.

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In the Car with R

Dreams in disguise

In the Car with R by Rafal Milach

Rafal Milach used a collage-like approach that was more casual in its presentation and experienced more in the form of a personal journal and less sculptural than Ian Teh’s Traces.

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How Can I Help?

Dreams in disguise

How Can I Help You by Saul Robbins

Saul Robbins had arguably the most interactive space there, where he offered free 15 minute psychotherapy sessions in a space that he created, with one half of the container simulating a therapists’ office.

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Dreams in Disguise

Dreams in Disguise by Luceo

Dreams in Disguise by Luceo

Luceo built their container closed with viewing slits at eye level to house a full video loop on one interior wall of their container.

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Here In The World

Here In The World from Instagram

Here In The World from Instagram

The Instagram double stack, Here In The World, had a mechanically geared roll of prints that stretched the full height of both containers and moved according to the grace of the volunteer that steered the wheel – to imitate the scroll of an Instagram feed. On the outside of the Instagram containers, an enormous, luminous installation of a boldly coloured prism glowed through the night, titled Chromatic Aberration, by James Marshall (above).

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The Beauty of the Photo Book

The Beauty of the Photo Book by

The Beauty of the Photo Book from Teun van der Heijden

The lectures were also a great part of Photoville that integrated the audience with its exhibitors, allowing open discussion over the more controversial works on display such as Christophe Bangert’s book, War Porn, in Teun van der Heijden’s curated container, The Beauty of the Photo Book.

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Alcohol and Reflection

Ultimately though, I ended up spending the most time in the beer garden… Not because of the drinks, but more to do with the strong sense of community that has been fostered at this festival, where new contacts are made, stale contacts are reacquainted and the old camaraderie between photographers and editors can engage in that unique festival mix of banter, intellectual stimuli and industry heckling.

Find out more about Photoville and make sure you head down in 2015.

Check out more of Ying Ang’s work.