In the wake of the decision by the supreme court to overturn Roe v Wade, thousands of protestors filled the streets to express their rage and anguish.

In the wake of the decision by the supreme court to overturn Roe v Wade, thousands of protestors filled the streets to express their rage and anguish.

Last week, a supreme court ruling overturning the constitutional right to abortion in the United States sent shockwaves across the world. The decision to upend the landmark Roe v. Wade case from nearly 50 years ago marked a reversal of a law that will do untold damage to reproductive rights in America.

The ruling came in the case Dobbs v Jackson Women’s Health Organisation in which the last abortion clinic in Mississippi opposed state efforts to ban abortion after 15 weeks and overturn Roe. After the leak of a draft of the ruling emerged last month, the decision may not have come as a total surprise, but many were still in shock.

In about 60 per cent of states, abortion is now banned, soon-to-be banned or under serious threat. This will force patients to travel hundreds of miles or self-manage abortions. The bans could also result in 60,000 births a year among women unable to obtain an abortion, affecting 41 per cent of women of reproductive age and hitting young, poor, Black and brown women and people who already have children hardest.

In wake of the decision, droves of protestors descended on the Supreme Court united in their rage and anguish. Many chanted: “We won’t go back! We won’t go back!” and  “My body, my choice!”. The protesters were joined at one point by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who vowed through a borrowed megaphone that the left would work to restore abortion rights. These protests have since spread across the nation.

Photographer Tim Evans was in Washington in the days following the decision to capture the action.

Following the overturning of Roe v. Wade, an abortion rights supporter holds up a coat hanger in front of the Supreme Court in Washington D.C. on June 25, 2022. Before abortion access was decriminalized federally in 1973, pregnant individuals were often forced to use coat hangers to terminate unwanted pregnancies at great risk to their health.

A sign reading “If abortions aren’t safe neither are you” lies on the ground near splattered red paint on the sidewalk outside the Supreme Court in Washington D.C. on June 25, 2022.

Abortions rights slogans line the legs of a protester outside the Supreme Court in Washington D.C. on June 25, 2022.

An abortion rights protester with red paint splattered between her legs raises her fist outside the Supreme Court in Washington D.C. on June 25, 2022.

Abortion rights signs line a fence surrounding the Supreme Court in Washington D.C. on June 25, 2022.

A woman holds a sign reading “Abortion is my right” outside the Supreme Court in Washington D.C. on June 25, 2022.

A woman takes part in a chant condemning the overturning of Roe v. Wade outside the Supreme Court in Washington D.C. on June 25, 2022.

Abortion rights protesters chant outside the Supreme Court in Washington D.C. on June 25, 2022.

Protesters condemn the overturning of Roe v. Wade as they march past the US Capitol in Washington D.C. on June 26, 2022.

A protester holds a sign reading “Our rights are not up for debate” outside the Supreme Court in Washington D.C. after Roe v. Wade was overturned. June 27, 2022.

Elizabeth Page White leads a “My body, my choice” chant outside the Supreme Court in Washington D.C. on June 27, 2022.

An abortion rights protester holds a sign reading “Respect our existence of expect resistance” outside the Supreme Court in Washington D.C. on June 27, 2022.

Follow Tim Evans on Instagram

Enjoyed this article? Like Huck on Facebook or follow us on Twitter.