Melancholy shots of Dublin in the ‘90s

Melancholy shots of Dublin in the ‘90s
In the shadows — After 25 years, Krass Clement’s black and white portraits of the Irish capital are being compiled for a new photo book.

In 1991, over the course of three short visits, Krass Clement shot the streets of Dublin. The Danish photographer was on a three-month residency at Ireland’s Tyrone Gurhie Centre in Annaghmakerrig, and felt compelled to capture the capital – drawn to its melancholy corners and shadowy streets.

His striking black and white portraits have now been compiled, over a quarter of a century later, into a new photo book called Dublin. Published by RRB, it contains all the images taken from Clement’s time in the city. “These photographs appear to show a city not rooted in the late 20th century, but rather a Dublin out of time, monochromatic in both rain and sun,” reads the book’s official summary. “A visual stream of consciousness on a stroll through the city, Clement’s work marries the traditions of Scandinavian melancholy and the ‘flaneur’ tradition from the Parisian school.”

Clement is most known for his 1996 photo book, Drum, which was taken over the course of an evening in a local pub in Drum, Ireland. The photographer allegedly used just over three rolls of film for the acclaimed project, as well as “five pints of Guinness.” It is seen as one of the most important contributions to the contemporary Danish photo world.

The release of Dublin will coincide with an exhibition of work by Krass Clement at city’s Gallery of Photography from 14 November 2017 – 14 January 2018.

Dublin, 1991 © Krass. Clement courtesy RRB PhotoBooks

Dublin, 1991 © Krass. Clement courtesy RRB PhotoBooks

Dublin, 1991 © Krass Clement courtesy RRB PhotoBooks

Dublin, 1991 © Krass Clement courtesy RRB PhotoBooks

Dublin, 1991 © Krass Clement courtesy RRB PhotoBooks

Dublin, 1991 © Krass Clement courtesy RRB PhotoBooks

Dublin, 1991 © Krass Clement courtesy RRB PhotoBooks

Dublin, 1991 © Krass Clement courtesy RRB PhotoBooks

Dublin, 1991 © Krass Clement courtesy RRB PhotoBooks

Dublin, 1991 © Krass Clement courtesy RRB PhotoBooks

Dublin, 1991 © Krass Clement courtesy RRB PhotoBooks

Dublin, 1991 © Krass Clement courtesy RRB PhotoBooks

Dublin, 1991 © Krass Clement courtesy RRB PhotoBooks

Dublin, 1991 © Krass Clement courtesy RRB PhotoBooks

Dublin, 1991 © Krass Clement courtesy RRB PhotoBooks

Dublin, 1991 © Krass Clement courtesy RRB PhotoBooks

Dublin, 1991 © Krass Clement courtesy RRB PhotoBooks

Dublin, 1991 © Krass Clement courtesy RRB PhotoBooks

Dublin by Krass Clement is published by RRB PhotoBooks on 30 November 2017.

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