Grown Man Business

Grown Man Business
Zine Scene — New photo book featuring photography on the road from Japan to the Ukraine launches in Melbourne at Monday Week gallery.

Grown Man Business is a new self-published photobook from photographer and curator Lola Paprocka. Featuring four talented photographers and skaters from Australia – Pani Paul, Lloyd Stubber, Callum Paul and James Whineray – and some of her own enigmatic ephemera, Grown Man Business is a journal of discovery and adventure everywhere from Ukraine to Japan.

Images from the ‘zine will be exhibited, large-format, at the Grown Man Business launch in Melbourne at the Monday Week Gallery on Thursday January 23. We caught up with the DIY polymath to find out more.

When and why did you start making Grown Man Business?
I started making GMB around October time last year. I approached James Whineray, Callum Paul, Lloyd Stubber and Pani Paul and asked them if they wanted to collaborate with me and be a part of my latest title. I contacted galleries in Melbourne and once I locked in the space I started working on the publication and show itself. I just really love Melbourne and I really wanted to put together an exhibition for the people there. It’s my first curated project, but will definitely not be my last.

Why did you choose print not digital?
I collect ‘zines and photobooks and I’ve always wanted to print my own. Pictures look so much better printed than on a computer screen. The amount of thought put into a publication is always so much more because you can’t simply just change it after a week. I think the saying goes, “Think before you print.” Haha.

How did you meet the artists featured in GMB and why did you want to collaborate with them?
I’ve know Pani for three years now and I’ve always wanted to collaborate with him, he inspires me so much. When I was in Melbourne last year I met James Whineray and Callum Paul and I really loved their work as well. James ended up showing me Lloyd Stubber’s pictures and I thought it would really suit the other artists so I asked him to join the project too. It all happened via emails as I’m based in London – and they’re in Australia – but it’s come together great nonetheless. They’ve all been super helpful and it was a pleasure to work with them on this ‘zine together.

When were all the photos shot and how did you decide on the layout?
All the photographs were taken within a year or so on our travels abroad. Between us, there are photographs from Australia, UK., Italy, Ukraine, Japan and Scotland. Once I received a collection of images from each artist I started to see what worked well together and went from there. Also, with the help of my amazing friend, the designer Mike Bartz. He really helped make this publication come together.

What do you do for a living and how does self-publishing fit into your life?
I run a small clothing label called Mamas Gun Co. in London and have managed tattoo shops for the last few years. I would love to focus more on self-publishing but I’m not looking into making money out of it – so I will probably continue having few jobs, haha. The plan this year though is to make more time to curate shows, make publications and focus more on my photography. That’s what I really enjoy the most.

Can you tell us a bit about the launch in Melbourne on Thursday…
The exhibition will feature several large-format prints from each photographer and will take place at Monday Week Gallery, in Melbourne – on January 23, 6-9pm. An A5, 48-page, saddle-stitched ‘zine featuring artwork from the show will be available at the launch along with limited-edition prints.

Have you swapped Grown Man Business for any other good publications?
I only printed GMB a few weeks ago and have been working on the show since. I haven’t had a chance to swap it just yet but I will definitely approach few people when I get back to the UK.

What are your favourite self-published photobooks?
Dawid Misiorny’s Wysiwyg. Lots of stuff by Kat Hanula, Callum Paul, Justyna Wierzchowiecka and Brian Kanagaki. I like Holy Ghost Zine, Stay Young Zine and Lloyd Stubber’s publications – my favourite so far is Colourblind. Also, my favourite independent publishing houses are Éditions FP&CF and books/fanzines by JSBJ. I’m also looking forward to Aga Jagustyn’s new book as she is a great curator.

Grown Man Business will be available online at Mamas Gun Co after the show. Keep your eyes peeled for a London exhibition in the next couple of months.

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