Capturing the real faces of the global migration crisis

Capturing the real faces of the global migration crisis
Polaroid portraits — A new exhibition in London, titled MIGRATE, sees eight photographers take on the concept of ‘human migration.’

A Somalian in Scotland, a young single mother, and a Sudanese teen living off dwindling family donations. These are the subjects of MIGRATE – a new exhibition capturing the real faces of the global migration crisis.

The show, put together by Unicef initiative NEXTGen, sees eight photographers from around the world respond to the topic of ‘human migration.’ All the work was shot exclusively on Polaroid cameras, with film supplied by The Impossible Project.

Photographers include Cyrus Mahboubian, Jack Harries, Alice Aedy, Ellie Kealey, Tom Skipp and Rhiannon Adam. “Living in London, we find ourselves largely detached from the ongoing refugee crisis, despite its staggering scale,” Mahboubian explains. “I wanted us to inspire fellow Londoners to have a conversation about it.” The photographer adds that, due to the nature of Polaroid film, he was forced to take fewer pictures, which made subject interactions feel “more personal.”

MIGRATE will run at Omeara from August 29th to September 2nd. An accompanying book, featuring all the portraits, subjects and their stories, is also available. All net proceeds will go towards Unicef’s Children of Syria Emergency Appeal.

Photography Wolf James

Photography Wolf James

Photography Ellie Kealey

Photography Ellie Kealey

Photography Rhiannon Adam

Photography Rhiannon Adam

Photography Alice Aedy

Photography Alice Aedy

Photography Cyrus Mahboubian

Photography Cyrus Mahboubian

Photography Vassilis Mathioudakis

Photography Vassilis Mathioudakis

Photography Tom Skipp

Photography Tom Skipp

Photography  Jack Harries

Photography Jack Harries

MIGRATE opens today at London’s Omeara, and runs until September 2nd. 

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