PUSH x Element

PUSH x Element
The New Collection — LA graffiti writer and artist PUSH is keeping his pattern consistent and switching up the canvas with his new PUSH x Element collab.

“To me it’s about progression, balance, creativeness, and [keeping things] natural,” says veteran of the Los Angeles graffiti and art scene PUSH. The LA local’s life in graffiti stems back to a childhood spent constantly drawing – “robots, cartoons, whatever” – and now, thanks to a new capsule collection and mural collab with Element, he’s taking his bright geometric murals to a slightly different canvas.

“Whatever the surface or medium is, it’s kind of a test in versatility,” says PUSH, who brought his strong line-work to life last year when he transformed the iconic Known Gallery on Fairfax with a 3D installation that filled the space like lasers. “To make something that is bold and vibrant, but natural in place. I want my work to look like it’s supposed to be on whatever it’s on – a wall, t-shirt, etc. And of course fashion reaches so many different types of people all over the world.”

The collection – which includes decks, a 5-panel cap, tees, shorts and a vest – is a natural extension of PUSH’s life-long artistic streak which has seen him writing graffiti for over twenty-one years; joining legendary crews MSK (Mad Society Kings) in 1995 and AWR (Art Work Rebels) a couple of years later. He also became part of the more recently formed Seventh Letter – a working collective that offers a professional output for artists beyond graffiti – and cites the founder of these crews, Casey Eklips, as a big inspiration for his journey. “He’s given me so many great opportunities and has helped so much with my career,” says PUSH, who is exhibiting at the new Seventh Letter space on Fairfax in October. “I’m not sure if any of us could see ourselves making a career out of what started out as graffiti.”

Alongside art, around third grade, PUSH was introduced to his other lifestyle mistress and an apparent influence on his moniker – skateboarding. After many years rolling and even painting a mural at Eric Koston and Steve Berra’s infamous private park, The Berrics, PUSH still sees the potential in a piece of ply. “Coming from skateboarding I’ve always wanted to see my artwork on skateboards,” says PUSH, fresh from painting 120 wall-mounted decks at the Element HQ in Costa Mesa. “The 120 skateboard mural is for the capsule collection launch and art show in May. It was a great opportunity and I think it will reach new audiences. We’re also taking the show to Paris.”

And by the looks of thing, PUSH is sticking to his guns – keeping this progressive, balanced and looking natural, regardless of whether he’s painting a wall or working on clothing. In his own words, “I think it all comes down to style – how you do things and how you don’t.”

The PUSH x Element collection launches in Paris on May 15, check the Facebook event for more information.

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